Diabetes Program

Diabetes

VISION
The vision of the Diabetes Prevention and Management Program is to promote health and quality of life in persons who are at risk for diabetes or have diabetes and to prevent or slow complications of diabetes.

MISSION
The Diabetes Prevention and Management Program will work with health care and community resources to develop, implement, evaluate and improve diabetes care and information within the Muscogee (Creek) Nation. These services will be sensitive to the unique needs of Creek citizens while meeting national, clinical and educational standards.

HISTORY

The Muscogee (Creek) Nation Diabetes Prevention and Management Program began in 1999 with the receipt of funds provided through the Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI). The SDPI was provided by the Federal Government and administered by the Indian Health Service. The stated intent of the SDPI was to prevent and treat diabetes in the Native American population. Through the ensuing years, the SDPI and other sources of funds have increased due to the needs identified in the Native American population as well as the improvements shown as a direct result of these funds.

Current funding provides for five to six staff members to be located at each of the five MCNDH clinics. A coordinating nurse, a case manager, a dietitian, a clerk, and an exercise programs manager make up each team. Some staff members provide services that are shared across clinics. The Lower Extremity Amputation Prevention (LEAP) nurses are shared across clinics The administrative staff consists of the Program Manager, a Staff Development Coordinator, an Administrative Assistant, a Purchasing Clerk and a Community Prevention/Complication Clerk.

The prevention and treatment of diabetes requires substantial contributions from all levels of personal, family, community, tribal and governmental sources. The Diabetes Program is only a part of all who contribute to improving treatment and more importantly preventing the onset of diabetes. We are encouraged to see increasing interest and contributions from all of these levels. Together, Muscogee people and their resources can reduce the incidence and consequences of diabetes.

FUNDING SOURCES AND CURRENT SERVICES
Funding currently comes from additional sources, including a second SDPI grant, called Healthy Heart Initiative and a portion of the IHS Funding Agreement for the Koweta Facility assigned to the Diabetes Program. Additional programs are funded by the Muscogee Nation including: 1) a Pedorthics, Orthotics, Podiatry, Prosthetics and other Services or “POPPS” program and starting in October, 2012, a Wound Care Program, 2) an elementary school program called “Move It and Prevent Diabetes”, 3) a Hop to Stop after school program, 4) Nene Hvkoce, a walking program for families, 5) Summer Youth Day Camps, 6) Vculvke (Elders) PRIDE Program, and 7) an Annual MCN Citizens’ Diabetes Awareness Summit.

As some of these services and supplies have become accepted as standard care, the Division of Health has assumed financial responsibility for these services and this has freed up Diabetes Program funds to be directed toward other gaps in diabetes care.

Current funding provides for five to six staff members to be located at each of the five MCNDH clinics. A coordinating nurse, a case manager, a dietitian, a clerk, and an exercise programs manager make up each team. Some staff members provide services that are shared across clinics. These are the Family Therapist, Lower Extremity Amputation Prevention (LEAP) nurses; a LEAP wound care nurse/clerk team, and an Advance Practice Nurse/LPN team. The administrative staff located at the division level consists of the Program Manager, a Complication and Control Coordinator, an Administrative Assistant, a Purchasing Clerk and a Community Prevention/Complication Clerk. The total number of staff for the MCN Diabetes Program is 37.

The prevention and treatment of diabetes requires substantial contributions from all levels of personal, family, community, tribal and governmental sources. The Diabetes Program is only a part of all who contribute to improving treatment and more importantly preventing the onset of diabetes. We are encouraged to see increasing interest and contributions from all of these levels. Together, Muscogee people and their resources can reduce the incidence and consequences of diabetes.

Community Prevention Programs:
If you or members of your family are interested in attending or participating in these programs or events, call your local Diabetes Program. See “Contact Information” for your nearest Muscogee (Creek) Nation Clinic.

  1. 1.Move It and Prevent Diabetes – School Program
  2. 2.Hop to Stop Diabetes – Jump Rope after school Program
  3. 3.Vculvke PRIDE (Elders) Program
  4. 4.Nene Hvkoce Tribal Walking Program
  5. 5.Annual Citizens’ Diabetes Awareness Summit
  6. 6.Mvskokvlke PRIDE Diabetes Summer Youth Day Camps

Clinic-based care
If you are interested in attending any of the services provided in Muscogee Clinics, you may ask your provider to refer you to them. You may also call the Diabetes Program directly. See “Contact Information” for your nearest Muscogee (Creek) Nation Clinic.

  1. Prediabetes
    1. Pre-diabetes screening
  • Through clinic visits
  1. Pre-diabetes brief education – 1and ½ hour class
  2. Diabetes Self-Management Education:
    1. Educating Partners in Care (EPIC) Basic Course for type 2 Diabetes
    2. Education for persons with type 1 diabetes are provided by endocrinology specialists in Tulsa
    3. Yearly Assessment for Diabetes Self-Management Support
    4. Lowering Your Cholesterol
    5. Controlling Your Blood Pressure
    6. Using Insulin in Type 2 Diabetes
  3. Self-Management Supplies
    1. Self-monitoring of Blood Glucose: Initial blood sugar meter and strips are provided in an educational session with a diabetes educator. For on-going needs, strips and lancets are prescribed by providers and provided through the pharmacy
    2. Self-monitoring Blood Pressure Kits: These are provided in an educational session with a diabetes educator. These may be group or individual sessions.
  4. Diabetes Clinic Care
    1. Regular follow up – by appointment 3 to 4 times a year with the primary care provider and clinic team
    2. Yearly Clinic – by appointment once a year to provide access to all annual diabetes tests and services
    3. Diabetes Case management – After results from Yearly Clinic are available, the diabetes case manager reviews them with each patient, arranges care as needed and as agreed to by patient and tracks receipt of care.
  5. Lower Extremity Amputation Prevention Program:
    1. Visual checks of feet at each clinic visit by nurses and providers
    2. Annual foot exams in yearly clinic
    3. Foot care – nail and callus care for persons unable to provide own care or whose feet are at high risk
    4. Therapeutic shoes – These are shoes that meet Medicare requirements for “diabetes shoes” and are fitted by a certified Pedorthist. After Yearly Clinic, the diabetes case manager will arrange appointment with the Pedorthist for persons assessed to have high risk feet.
  6. Complication Care:
    1. The clinic team and the Diabetes Program staff join to provide diabetes self-management education and appropriate treatment that follows national standards of care for early and advanced stages of diabetes complications
  • Diabetes Eye Disease
  • Diabetes Gum Disease
  • Diabetes Heart Disease
  • Diabetes Kidney Disease
  • Diabetes High Risk Feet
  • Diabetes Neuropathy

Administrative Office: (918) 756-2240

Eufaula Clinic: (918) 689-2547, ext. 254

Koweta Clinic: (918) 279-3398

Okemah Clinic: (918) 623-1424, ext 456

Okmulgee Clinic: (918) 591-5755

Sapulpa Clinic: (918) 224-9310, ext 242

 

 

Phone: 1.800.782.8291 918.756.0310
1212 S. Belmont PO BOX 400
Okmulgee, OK 74447